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Fencing: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

3-8-17 fencing

Fencing is a necessary tool for managing livestock and pastures. There are several different varieties of fencing, and depending on the purpose of the fence, any zoning laws, and the land structure it’s on can significantly change the type of fence needed.

The Good – Fencing helps to protect and control your animals. It keeps them in, and keeps other potential dangers out. Choosing the correct type of fencing is often the most challenging aspect. The fencing must be able to be built over the terrain on your operation. Fencing not only physically encloses animals, but visually lets them know their boundaries. Leaps and bounds have been made in the technology of fencing from post materials and equations to figure out the length between each given one, fencing materials and structure, and longevity. Some fences have a lifespan of up to 50 years with regular maintenance!

The Bad –   A necessary evil: maintenance. Fences are necessary to have, but they must be maintained in order to function properly. Depending on the type of fence used, maintenance could be lessened, but there should still be regular checks to ensure it is intact. High-Tensile wire fencing is long-lasting and flexes slightly so it won’t break. If an animal were to run into it or a tree branch fell on it, the fencing wouldn’t break. If you used a wooden fence, you may need to do a repair. Wooden fences also need to be painted or stained regularly every few years. 

The Ugly –   Initial cost of purchasing and installing the fence. It’s probably going to be a big number, dependent on the feet needed and the kind of fence you choose to purchase. Remember, this is an INVESTMENT. A quality fence could last years or even decades with proper care. You only have to pay the cost of it once. What’s even uglier to think about? Seeing your animals wander away because they aren’t fenced in.

Sources:

Arcuri, Lauren. “Type of Fence on the Farm.” The Spruce

Booher, Matt. “Fencing Doesn’t Have to be a Limiting Factor.” Progressive Cattleman

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